Burroughs Adding Machine

Social justice, arts and politics, life in New York City

Limbaugh Explains Oprah and Obama’s Success

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You guessed it: Because they’re black.

In this searing clip, Keith Olbermann smacks down Limbaugh and his racist comments (the fun starts at 2:10). More than Glenn Beck and his ridiculous new job as a college professor (Olbermann’s “worse” person award), Rush Limbaugh earns Olbermann’s coveted “Worst Person in the World” award.

Among other odious comments, Limbaugh ranted on his weekend radio show:

[Obama] wouldn’t have been voted president if he weren’t black. Somebody asked me over the weekend, “Why does somebody earn a lot of money, have a lot of money?” I said it’s because he’s black.

It gets worse.

There’s a lot of guilt out there, to show we’re not racists, we’ll make this person wealthy and big and famous and so forth….

Thanks for explaining it all (and for using small words), Rush.

And thanks to Olbermann for doing what he does, drawing our attention to racist remarks like these ones, hiding in plain sight.

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Filed under: hate, media, obama, politics, race, racism, , , , , , ,

An Interview with South Africa’s Proud Racist

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John Oliver, the Englishman with impeccable timing, finds the last remaining racist in South Africa.

“This isn’t your Tea Party racism,” Oliver says, tasting a bit of the South African soil: “This is the good stuff.”

Filed under: africa, football, racism, , , , , , , ,

Indian Americans and the Usefulness of Covering

Southern governor (and candidate) Jindal and Haley are Indian American

If Nikki Haley wins her bid to become the governor of South Carolina, she will join Bobby Jindal at the highest level of Indian Americans in contemporary politics.

This should be a moment of triumph, right? Indian Americans around the country should be rejoicing at the representation, the similar-toned faces and shared priorities, shouldn’t they?

Or, like me, did you not realize that both of these high-profile politicians were of Indian heritage?

Born Nimrata Randhawa, Nikki Haley is the daughter of Indian Punjabi Sikhs who emigrated from Amritsar, India. Her colleague, the current governor of Louisiana, Piyush Jindal, was raised in a Hindu household by Indian immigrants, converting to Christianity in high school and eventually baptized as Roman Catholic while at Brown. It’s telling that both politicians converted to Christianity at an early age.

In The Daily Beast, Tunku Varadarajan analyzes the success of these American-born politicians: not only have they removed the ethnicity from their birthnames (essentially whitewashing their public title) or exchanging their family’s religion in favor of the majority’s faith, but both public figures have adopted radically conservative stands that mirror the views of their Southern constituencies. As Varadarajan asks:

What explains the success of Jindal and Haley in their respective states? In posing this question, I hint, of course, at the South’s lingering reputation for racial intolerance; and who can deny that the two states in question have not always been at the forefront of America’s historical striving for racial amity?

I was first introduced to the concept of “covering” (as opposed to “passing”) by NYU Law School professor Kenji Yoshino in his book of the same name. Covering, essentially, is actively playing down one’s difference, whether racial, ethnic, sexual, or physical.

FDR covered his physical disability when he presented himself to the public behind his desk, chest-high, his wheelchair absent from view. Vanessa Hudgens and Nicole Sherzinger cover when they play ethnically ambiguous roles and decline to discuss their Filipino heritage. Anderson Cooper and Jodie Foster cover when they purposefully avoid disclosing their sexuality to advance career and avoid controversy. As Yoshino writes:

Everyone covers. To cover is to tone down a disfavored identity to fit into the mainstream. In our increasingly diverse society, all of us are outside the mainstream in some way.

Haley and Jindal are only the latest in the long history of American covering. What’s frustrating, for me, is not the theory of covering but the actuality of it: that public figures must conform to whitestream notions of normalcy to achieve success. What if Haley or Jindal expressed outrage over racial profiling in Arizona? Would it jeopardize their conservative political careers?

And by covering the essential, indivisible part of their ethnic identity, what kind of message are these very public figures sending to Indian American children? That to take pride in one’s heritage–or to speak against discriminatory policies rooted in xenophobia–creates unnecessary dissent?

For M. Night Shymalan, who whitewashed the summer blockbuster The Last Airbender, issues of covering are irrelevant because people of color are literally represented in his film. That all of the heroes were cast as white actors and the villains played by people of color does not trouble him:

Maybe they didn’t see the faces that they wanted to see but, overall, it is more than they could have expected. We’re in the tent and it looks like the U.N. in there.

What’s the use of a place at the table if we have to cover our identity to get there?

Filed under: asian america, government, india, media, politics, race, racism, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Whitewashing a Summer Blockbuster

The phenomenon of whitewashing is a little like racism’s polite younger brother. He takes his place at the table, mostly silent except for a “yes, please” or “no, thank you” when addressed, and hopes that no one will notice his presence. The Last Airbender is the latest film to receive Hollywood’s whitewashing.

Avatar: The Last Airbender, the source material for the film, was a children’s television show rooted in Asian culture, including Buddhist and Hindu philosophy, Chinese calligraphy, characters that were clearly Asian (with names such as Aang, Katara and Sokka), and, perhaps most promisingly, Asian actors cast in the lead roles.

This pride in the show’s Asian heritage changed in the last two years as the series made a transition to film. Out of the four lead Asian characters, four White actors were cast. Audition flyers explicitly solicited for actors in this way: “Caucasian or any other ethnicity.”

Later, when one of the four actors dropped out, Dev Patel of Slumdog Millionaire was cast. Good for the diversity of the cast; bad for the representation of Asians, since Patel was cast as the villain.

Though a single incident of institutionalized racism (and one understandable from a purely business point-of-view–after all, if the point is to sell tickets, you market to the largest audience, in this case, White moviegoers), the whitewashing of The Last Airbender reflects a larger, persistent history of whitewashing in the U.S. From the racist caricatures of Charlie Chan in the 1920’s to the casting of a White woman to play the Asian female lead in Pearl S. Buck’s The Good Earth as early as 1937, Hollywood has consistently reduced Asians to villains and minor characters.

Recent films such as 21, about a group of Asian students from MIT who created a plan to steal millions from Las Vegas casinos, was cast with Caucausian actors Jim Sturgess and Kate Bosworth in the lead.

The sad thing about The Last Airbender is the missed opportunity for Asian Americans–whether actors, moviegoers, or, most importantly, Asian American children–to see representations of themselves on the big screen.

How can you engage in a discussion of the problem? Racebending offers a video with some helpful tips below.

Filed under: asian america, business, film, , , , , , , , , , , ,

Effigy of Obama Set on Fire

There’s not much to say about this unfortunate incident in West Allis, Wisconsin.

In the grainy video, patrons of Yesteryears Bar set up an effigy of President Obama and light it, country music playing in the background. Thank goodness someone had the good sense to tape it and post it for the world to see. When the image of Obama finally catches fire, the patrons can be heard whooping it up.

How many steps until we’ve got a mob? And is this simple stupidity, or outward (not so subtle) displays of racism?

Filed under: hate, obama, , , , ,

Publications

BIOGRAPHY

RECENT PUBLICATIONS
» "Pinays," AGNI, Spring 2016
» "Dandy," Post Road, Spring 2015
» "Wrestlers," Fifth Wednesday, Spring 2014
» "Babies," Joyland, August 2011
» "Nicolette and Maribel," BostonNow, May 2007
» "The Rice Bowl," Memorious, March 2005
» "The Rules of the Game," Screaming Monkeys: Critiques of Asian American Images (Coffee House Press, June 2003)
» "Deaf Mute," Growing Up Filipino (Philippine American Literary House, April 2003)
» "Good Men ," Genre, April 2003
» "The Foley Artist," Drunken Boat, April 2002
» "Squatters," Take Out: Queer Writing from Asian Pacific America (Asian Am. Writers' Workshop, 2001)
» "Deaf Mute," The North American Review, Jan 2001
» "The First Lady of Our Filipino Nation," The Boston Phoenix, 1999
» "Paper Route," Flyway Literary Review, 1996
» "Brainy Smurf and the Council Bluffs Pride Parade," Generation Q (Alyson, 1996)
September 2017
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About Me

Ricco Villanueva Siasoco is a Manhattan-based writer and non-profit manager. More

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