Burroughs Adding Machine

Social justice, arts and politics, life in New York City

Literary Nonfiction and Hollywood Film: Perfect Strangers

Hollywood meets Journalism: Writer/director Sean Penn and Nonfiction writer Jon Krakauer in front of McCandless' last place of residence

My partner and I watched Sean Penn’s really stunning, really sympathetic portrait of Christopher McCandless in Into the Wild last night and afterward, debated the meaning of creative nonfiction. At least the idea of creative nonfiction–both the literary genre and as it applies to film–was my concern. And as is often the case, we argued. Our misunderstandings emerge from a place where I often think one thing, get frustrated with his incomprehension of the thing I am deliberating, and metaphorically throw my hands in the air. Talking to me must not be an easy thing for any sane person to do.

I digress. Creative nonfiction. I think it’s a great metaphor for the Hollywood approach to film (or should I say movies)? Into the Wild, The Orchid Thief, Jarhead, A Million Little Pieces: all recent, acclaimed, best-selling works of nonfiction. I’m not saying they were personal favorites. But I acknowledge their commercial success, and the glint in the eyes of Hollywood producers, who would translate these essentially “true” stories to mass movie entertainment.

But what are filmmakers’ responsibilities to real life? To the sequencing of events, for example? To the dialogue of real people, both those that existed and those created for the sake of the narrative, and the infinite truths that each of these living (or dead) people know about their own stories?

Christopher McCandless, in one of the few photographs from his travelsIn the case of Into the Wild, for example. I have no doubt that Jon Krakauer, in his bestselling work of nonfiction, did extensive, carefully cited research. He spent hours, days, years, uncovering the story of the 22 year-old who graduated from Emory, donated his life savings (more than twenty thousand dollars) to Oxfam (good for him), and set off to tramp around the country, untethered to material goods and in search of true experience.

But how can a film with dozens of actors who have never met the real man, a writer/director who has never met the deceased young man, and millions of filmgoers, seated in darkened theaters or watching from laptops in private corners of their homes, truly know the experience of Chris McCandless? Yes, the film is based on his journals and interviews with family and friends he met on the road. But is this the truth? Whose truth? And don’t all of us who have learned and been entertained by the story, in a sense, diminish McCandless’ experience, revering and mythmaking (or converesely, criticizing and demeaning) this human through our communal processing?

I don’t mean to be critical. More to meditate and discover. True story to film is, of course, a natural and longstanding thing. And in the case of Sean Penn’s Into the Wild, I don’t think he has characterized the adventurer McCandless poorly. It is the sheer fact of the characterization I’m interested in. The ways that authors and audiences seize facts and events and shape them for their own purposes.

The poet Sharon Olds, who contributes to "Into the Wild"Another example of creative nonfiction in this studio film: the use of a poem by Sharon Olds. Olds may be one of my favorite poets, brutal and gorgeous, unflinching and transcendent. In my view, the poet takes the quotidian events of her own experience–watching her little boy play with others at a birthday party, talking to her daughter about Mickey Mouse–and crafts these real moments into art. The boys become metaphors for soldiers of war or the violence indivisible from gender; the mother and daughter a lesson on sex and finding beauty, not shame, in the female body. Olds is one-of-a-kind. Sean Penn, too, admires her, and utilized her poem “I Go Back to May 1937” for an extended montage midway through his film to give body to the family of McCandless.

This combination of real people (the McCandless family), contemporary poetry (Olds’ poem about her own parents), and aesthetic concern (Penn’s interest in showing the intricacies of a typical American family) are the ingredients for what we see on the big screen. Little of this is concretely tied to the wanderings and networks of McCandless’ inner life. We can presume, from the writings that he left, that we’re embracing the essence of his thoughts and feelings. Can we be certain that the many parties involved have captured what McCandless himself felt?

Memoirist and journalist Vivian Gornick, one of the greats, reflects on the New Journalists’ use of creative nonfiction in this way: “We all felt that immediate experience signified. Wherever a writer looked, there was a narrative line to be drawn from the political tale being told on a march, at a party, during a chance encounter.”

The double-edged sword of creative nonfiction. To tell the truth and to tell a story. Perfect accompaniments or polar opposites? And how does creative nonfiction–in a literary sense–compare with Hollywood films whose purpose is to fictionalize real events for entertainment?

Advertisements

Filed under: culture, film, writing, , , , , , , , , , ,

Friday Yucks

In the department of absurd uses of streaming video, this clip of a salsa-dancing labrador takes the cake. There is, of course, more important news in the world (the least of which is that Washington state voters approved Referendum 71, that affords crucial benefits to domestic partners). But isn’t there also room for dogs who can do circus tricks?

I used to be one of those naysayers who clucked his tongue at dog lovers. And then I got a dog. Click play.

Vodpod videos no longer available.

more about “Salsa dog“, posted with vodpod

 

Filed under: entertainment, , , , , ,

Publications

BIOGRAPHY

RECENT PUBLICATIONS
» "Pinays," AGNI, Spring 2016
» "Dandy," Post Road, Spring 2015
» "Wrestlers," Fifth Wednesday, Spring 2014
» "Babies," Joyland, August 2011
» "Nicolette and Maribel," BostonNow, May 2007
» "The Rice Bowl," Memorious, March 2005
» "The Rules of the Game," Screaming Monkeys: Critiques of Asian American Images (Coffee House Press, June 2003)
» "Deaf Mute," Growing Up Filipino (Philippine American Literary House, April 2003)
» "Good Men ," Genre, April 2003
» "The Foley Artist," Drunken Boat, April 2002
» "Squatters," Take Out: Queer Writing from Asian Pacific America (Asian Am. Writers' Workshop, 2001)
» "Deaf Mute," The North American Review, Jan 2001
» "The First Lady of Our Filipino Nation," The Boston Phoenix, 1999
» "Paper Route," Flyway Literary Review, 1996
» "Brainy Smurf and the Council Bluffs Pride Parade," Generation Q (Alyson, 1996)
December 2017
M T W T F S S
« Jul    
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031

Twitter

Error: Twitter did not respond. Please wait a few minutes and refresh this page.

Visitor Map

Locations of Site Visitors

RSS Recent Posts from Towleroad

  • New Study Finds Gay Relationships Are Often Happier Than Heterosexual Ones
    A new study has found that gay couples tend to have better relationships when compared with their heterosexual counterparts. The study, titled “Sexual Identity and Relationship Quality in Australia and the United Kingdom,” examined the relationship q… Read The post New Study Finds Gay Relationships Are Often Happier Than Heterosexual Ones appeared first on T […]
  • In New Video, Morrissey Corrects the Record, Says He Was Grilled by Secret Service Over Anti-Trump Remarks
    In a new video posted to his nephew’s YouTube account, Morrissey is defending himself against an article that appeared earlier this year that appeared in the German publication Der Spiegel. “Please, please, don’t believe what other… Read The post In New Video, Morrissey Corrects the Record, Says He Was Grilled by Secret Service Over Anti-Trump Remarks appear […]
  • Trump Is Afraid of Firing Mueller
    President Trump has ended speculation he may fire special counsel Robert Mueller, after Trump’s team’s recent attacks on the credibility of the ex-FBI director’s probe into Russian collusion. With Mueller’s investigation making its way into the… Read The post Trump Is Afraid of Firing Mueller appeared first on Towleroad.
  • Man Arrested After Trying to Trade Chicken Alfredo and Sprite for Sex with Underage Male: WATCH
    A 22-year-old student at Youngstown State University in Ohio was arrested last week in a sting by police after offering Chicken Alfredo and Sprite for underage sex. Albert Maruna IV was arrested after making the arrangements with a police officer pos… Read The post Man Arrested After Trying to Trade Chicken Alfredo and Sprite for Sex with Underage Male: WATC […]
  • Pressure grows on UK Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson to Veto Bermuda Gay Marriage Repeal
    UK lawmaker Boris Johnson is under pressure to overrule a ban on same-sex marriage in Bermuda. In May, the British overseas territory legalized same-sex marriage but reversed that ruling last week. The new law requires the signature of British Govern… Read The post Pressure grows on UK Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson to Veto Bermuda Gay Marriage Repeal appea […]

Polls

RSS Breaking News from The Daily Beast

  • An error has occurred; the feed is probably down. Try again later.

Pics from Africa 2010

About Me

https://rsiasoco.wordpress.com/about/

About Me

Ricco Villanueva Siasoco is a Manhattan-based writer and non-profit manager. More

Top Clicks

  • None

Categories