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Are We Alone in the Universe? Hawking Responds.

Common wisdom holds that if alien life exists (and isn’t it presumptious for us to believe we’re the only life form among 100 billion galaxies?), we should fear invasion or colonization.

Stephen Hawking concurs.

In his new television series for Discovery, called Into the Universe, the “world’s most famous scientific mind” acknowledges the possibility that these alien life forms may even be more intelligent than humans. More than human contact or curiosity, these advanced beings may simply want Earth’s resources:

We only have to look at ourselves to see how intelligent life might develop into something we wouldn’t want to meet. I imagine they might exist in massive ships, having used up all the resources from their home planet. Such advanced aliens would perhaps become nomads, looking to conquer and colonise whatever planets they can reach.”“We only have to look at ourselves to see how intelligent life might develop into something we wouldn’t want to meet. I imagine they might exist in massive ships, having used up all the resources from their home planet. Such advanced aliens would perhaps become nomads, looking to conquer and colonise whatever planets they can reach.

The series is Hawking’s life work, and tries to bridge the gap between popular science and his research in theoretical physics, applied mathematics, and quantum gravity.

But what are the hazards of Hawking’s thoughts on alien contact? The renowned scientist draws a striking analogy between potential alien visits and our crimes of the past:

If aliens ever visit us, I think the outcome would be much as when Christopher Columbus first landed in America, which didn’t turn out very well for the Native Americans.

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Filed under: science, , , , , , ,

The Odiousness of Arizona’s Immigration Bill

Jim Wallis provides a searing indictment of Arizona’s shameful immigration bill in today’s Huffington Post. The repressive, discriminatory bill has passed both houses of the Arizona legislature and awaits the governor’s signature (she is likely to sign the bill).

Why is this law so discriminatory?

Senate Bill 1070 enables and protects police in racial profiling. The law empowers police with the ability to stop anyone whom the officer believes there is “reasonable suspicion” he or she might be an undocumented immigrant. As Wallis notes:

Those without identification papers, even if they are legal, are subject to arrest; so don’t forget your wallet on your way to work if you are Hispanic in Arizona. You can also be arrested if you are stopped and are simply with people who are undocumented — even if they are your family.

Alfredo Gutierrez, former state senator and founder and editor of La Frontera Times.com, a daily digital newspaper that advocates for undocumented immigrants and immigration reform, stated the issue more pointedly: this is a bill that goes after brown people.

During an episode of On Point yesterday, Gutierrez challenged Rep. John Kavanaugh, the prime sponsor of the Arizona bill. Kavanaugh defended the bill’s tenets, arguing that the issue of illegal immigration was one of geography–not racial profiling. The Republican lawmaker’s reasoning is that illegal immigration is strictly a problem of proximity to Mexico. Don’t worry, Kavanaugh seems to imply: people of all races will be pulled over in Arizona, whether white, black, or brown.

The simple, unfortunate truth is that this new law will legalize racial profiling. As Wallis states in his passionate article:

Arizona’s SB 1070 must be named as a social and racial sin, and should be denounced as such by people of faith and conscience across the nation. This is not just about Arizona, but about all of us, and about what kind of country we want to be. It’s time to stand up to this new strategy of “deportation by attrition,” which I heard for the first time today in Arizona. It is a policy of deliberate political cruelty, and it should be remembered that “attrition” is a term of war.

Filed under: immigration, , , , , , , , , ,

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BIOGRAPHY

RECENT PUBLICATIONS
» "Pinays," AGNI, Spring 2016
» "Dandy," Post Road, Spring 2015
» "Wrestlers," Fifth Wednesday, Spring 2014
» "Babies," Joyland, August 2011
» "Nicolette and Maribel," BostonNow, May 2007
» "The Rice Bowl," Memorious, March 2005
» "The Rules of the Game," Screaming Monkeys: Critiques of Asian American Images (Coffee House Press, June 2003)
» "Deaf Mute," Growing Up Filipino (Philippine American Literary House, April 2003)
» "Good Men ," Genre, April 2003
» "The Foley Artist," Drunken Boat, April 2002
» "Squatters," Take Out: Queer Writing from Asian Pacific America (Asian Am. Writers' Workshop, 2001)
» "Deaf Mute," The North American Review, Jan 2001
» "The First Lady of Our Filipino Nation," The Boston Phoenix, 1999
» "Paper Route," Flyway Literary Review, 1996
» "Brainy Smurf and the Council Bluffs Pride Parade," Generation Q (Alyson, 1996)
July 2019
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About Me

https://rsiasoco.wordpress.com/about/

About Me

Ricco Villanueva Siasoco is a Manhattan-based writer and non-profit manager. More

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